google "Oxecta"

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nhm
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Thats probably for the best,

Thats probably for the best, niacin can be...unpleasant (so Ive heard;).

Melinda

celticgreenman
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Does not contain niacin

I called Pfizer this morning, but got referred to King. So, according to the pharmacist at King (Pfizer) Oxecta DOES NOT contain niacin. If you wish to call yourself the number is 1-800-776-3637.

Oxecta DOES NOT contain niacin.

cgm

Pain-n-TnLady
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Thank You CGM,

Finally some real information!  You can see from the article I posted where all the confusion is coming from. It seems as if some newspaper reporters got confused also.  My question now is that, if Oxecta doesn't contain Niacin, other than the gelling properties, what are the abuse detterants? What's the big deal?

nhm
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I dont know, but think, its

I dont know, but think, its similar (or same as?) to the oxycontin OPs, with the gelling properties.  Not sure though, and am thankful that for now at least, I dont have to worry about them messing with my meds, as I am only taking gabapentin and lortab. Im sure they will get around to it eventually, though.Undecided

CGM? Did they mention what the abuse deterent consisted of?

 

Take care,

Melinda

celticgreenman
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Oxecta

The deterrent is the gelling compound, which is proprietary. Its action is similar to (but not the same as) that of the OxyContin OP. It makes it near impossible to inject, and difficult to use nasally (it also irritates the nasal mucos, but not with the niacin, the gelling compound does it).

The gelling compound in OxyContin is also designed to be an extended release mechanism. Whereas, Oxecta is an immediate release formulation.

cgm

nhm
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Interesting. Thanks for the

Interesting. Thanks for the reliable info, we appreciate it.

Melinda

quincy
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"Actavis" Oxycodone IR 30mg

A very informative thread this. However, I don't see much info on the several other generic Oxy manufacturers like Mallinkrodt (sp?), Actavis, et al. I have been Rx'ed the OxyIR 30 mg 6/d for almost 5 years now and my preferred pharmacy most usually carries the Activis generic. Do these contain Niacin? I have a mild allergy to Niacin, the symptoms of which are very similar to the side effects that I have been attributing to the Oxycodone.

If indeed Actavis contains Niacin it would really improve my "quality of life" if I could switch to a brand that is Niacin free, if there is such a beast. I have a very slow growing, inoperable, and uncurable cancerous tumor. I plan on living for many more years, 15 at least, so it is very important for me to learn all I can about the numerous meds thnat I am Rx'ed. As my Health Ins. Co. considers quality of life a deal maker/breaker when it comes to approving my pain meds, I am certain that they would approve a Niacin free OxyIR 30mg for me no matter what the cost. A case in point; Humana, through Medicare's Plan D Catastrophic clause, shells out a little over $7,000 p/m for my Fentora 600mcg #120 Rx which I need for BTP. My co-pay is $0.

Cgman, Saturated (Glad to see you back, good buddy.), Medic008, et al, please let me know if there is a Niacin free OxyIR 30mg out there.

                                                                    Thx . . . Q

celticgreenman
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No Niacin

quincy,

None of the generic Oxycodone HCl IR tablets contain Naicin.

.
King and Acura Pharmaceuticals were researching the addition of Niacin to their Acurox tablets, as a second deterrent to abuse. This formulation (Acurox + Niacin) did not get approval by the FDA. The Acurox without Niacin, remaned Oxecta, was the formulation that did get approved.

.
You don't have to worry about any of the oxycodone HCl, immediate release formulations. They do not contain Niacin.

The side effects of Niacin that usually bother people are the itching, red skin, , flushing, warm beeling, prickling or tingling sensation, and GI distress.

If you think you are getting unpleasant side effects from your medicines, you should note what they consist of, how long after taking the medicine that they appear, how long they last, and what do you have to do to make them go away. Then take the information to your physician. Possibly, the medicines can either be changed, or if they are absolutely necessary, something can be given to lessen the impact of the side effects.

Hope you figure out what is causing the side effects you are having.

cgm

quincy
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Change of meds . . .

Celtic, thx for the cogent reply guy. I did end up switching from a higher dosage of Oxycodone (300mgs p/d) to the FTD 100mcg patch with just 180mgs p/d of the OxyIR 30s in Aug. of '09. The major side effect that I experienced at the higher dose was severe and frequent (6-10 times a night) "charley horse" cramps that would last for 3 to 8 minutes. OUCH!!! I still get flushed along with "Hot Flashes" but these are more likely to be attributed to the Lupron depot hormone therapy that keeps the tetosterone, hence the advanced prostate cancer, at bay. The drugs at fault for my other SE's have been ID'ed . . . case in point; My use of Fentora 600mcg 4/d for BTP is the direct cause of temporary difficulty with urination.

Thx again for putting my mind at ease . . . Q

PS: Celtic, from all the reports that I have read on Purdue's OxyContin, it is not a true extended release system like FTD or some of the other transdermal patches. It's actually a bi-phasic release system; an OxyContin 40mg immediately releases 40 mg of oxycodone in the stomach and upper intestines. Then, anywhere from 2 to 8 hours later it releases the remaining 40 mgs. The discrepancy in release times can be attributed to anything from the level of and ph balance of your stomach acid, when you last ate, your metabolism's ability to break down the "release barrier', and the list goes on. Purdue was fined $150,000 in '07 for these problems but Purdue was allowed to keep the misleading name of OxyContin. The "Contin" Is a tad too suggestive of "continual", don't you think?

celticgreenman
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Biphasic

From what I have read in the trade news, you are correct that OxyContin is a biphasic medicine. In that it does has a small amount of immediate release medication, but then the rest of the medicine is released over time.

Again, you are correct in that the continual release portion can be affected by so many different things. And as such, different patients can get different effects from the same medicine.

cgm