From a Drs view.....

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RandemBanG
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In the past

i SEEN 1st hand the burning of medical waste at a i wont name cement plant thats main office is in mexico 55 gal drums of the stuff with old tires tossed on a belt and sent up the the keln or whatever its called ill tell ya what very very hot i guess tires and coal and wood chips and med waste burn preety good

Psych2B
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new med form

Jesterisin , is it safe to assume you are referring to the new Oxycontin formula?  I have read up on it, as I am also taking that.  As far as I have read, if the new formula doesn't work for you, you doctor can request for you to recieve the old formula but must include the reason for the need for the old ones.  The new formula is not in my area yet, thankfully! and I am worried how I will react to it, as I have so many sensitivities.  Good luck!  Hope you get something that works!  and I agree... if you find something that works, stick with it!

BeavisMom62
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LOL, Erin!  responding to

LOL, Erin!  responding to your post #10.  I was wondering about that when you said about getting behind the wheel drowsy or impaired.  I knew you didn't mean that, but I'm glad you clarified just the same.

Also, I agree about being in an accident that wasn't even your fault, but if you are found to have meds in your system, then YOU are the guilty one.  I don't even feel my Norco when I take it, either immediately or hours later.  I would never consider myself impaired.  It doesn't affect my driving.  But, unfortunately, in the eyes of the law, you are guilty.  Its like with my (soon to be ex) hubby.  The man can drink an 18 pack of beer, starting at 10 am.  He can get behind the wheel at ANY time of the day (or walk a straight line, or pass a field sobriety test) and you would NEVER know that he had been drinking.  Of course a blood alcohol test would show differently.  But the law makes no allowances for how you "feel", its only what they "see". And while I disagree with it, where would you draw the line?  How would you draw the line?  Just because someone who is a PM patient and not opiate naive "says" that they aren't impaired, how could you yourself prove it?  Ya know?

I remember years ago, I was working for a doc who did drug tests.  And I came up positive for....um....."green smoke".  I told this doc that I certainly don't smoke at work or before work, only before bed or on the weekends.  I did not come to work impaired.  But he told me (not sure if I believe this or not, but in theory I suppose it could be true), that even if you don't "feel" impaired, the fact that you have ANY amount in your system means that you are not performing at full capacity, whether you feel it or not.  It affects your job performance as compared to being totally "clean".  So, there is my other analogy to the driving while "impaired" argument! LOL.

And as far as throwing meds in the garbage, in theory, its the same as flushing them.  They end up in the landfills anyhow, where they end up in the ground and in the water table.  Same as you said about dissolving the pills.  Then what do you do with it?  Either flush it or pour it down the sink.  and it still ends up in the water table, septic system, ground water, etc.  As far as I know, burning is the safest, most environmentally correct way to dispose of meds (but it is?  What does the smoke do to the environment?  The air?).  UNfortunately, its just not available to us "normal" folk.

moonshine
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Responding to the original

Responding to the original post here about driving on medications...

I do drive, but I do not drive if I feel drowsy. I also never drive children (I have relatives with small children) in my car.

I don't have any of my own children (really want some one day, don't know if it'll happen)...but, if I had kids, I wouldn't be able to drive with them in the car. That is a personal decision though, because I don't think I could live with myself if something happened.

Also, I tend to only drive by myself. If someone else is with me, I will ask them to drive.

Last thing is that I don't drive on highways because of fear. My injury is due to a car accident, and the last time I drove on a highway, I completely panicked. It was terrible. So, I will never again drive on a highway.

Some people say that you should never drive while you take pain medication, or other medications, but I do. 

Moonshine

jareddakid2
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the same

Could be applied to the person who ingested, as b mom put it, green smoke perhaps weeks before a accident or traffic stop and gets a dui. Its not that cut and dry as police have trained experts at their disposal, who to a great degree of accuracy, can determine the state or level of influence a person may be under.

BeavisMom62
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True Jarred.  But the blood

True Jarred.  But the blood drug levels would be the same in a CP patient who's been on meds for years opposed to a teenager who just raided mommy's drug cabinet for the first time, if say they both took a Percocet at noon and got pulled over at 3 pm.  A CP patient likely wouldn't be "showing" any intoxication at all, whereas the teenager could be obviously under the influence.

(Ok, I was trying to make some point there and now I don't know what it was!  Never mind. There was a good argument in there somewhere!) Embarassed

BeavisMom62
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Moonshine.  Good for you. 

Moonshine.  Good for you.  Its amazing the things that I see at work about people driving.  We have this one little old lady who is not only near blind, but also has mild dementia.  And she drives her self all over town without giving it a thought. She's even admitted to hitting curbs, mailboxes, her driveway and almost causing accidents, but she still drives.  Then we have another person who has had a mild head injury.  His biggest problem at this point is depression and a little forgetfulness and sometimes gets a little confused while driving.  Doesn't cause accidents or hit anything, but he's decided on his own, without any doctor saying so, to stop driving for the next year until his brain has a chance to heal.  Now granted, this little old lady lives alone and has no one to drive her but this young man has many family members available for transportation. So, I'm sure that's part of it.  But darn, if and when this little old lady harms herself or someone else, it could be tragic. 

jareddakid2
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true

Bmom. Good point. Tolerance plays a large role in a case Like that.

spacednow
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Thankfully since most of us

Thankfully since most of us drive it's not the norm to test. Only in bad accidents, at least around here. If you can walk and talk, at least most cops have video in their cars and that can be used to help demonstate that there is no impairment. Then agian with a blood test you are probably giong to get shafted here, I live in a zero tolerance state.

Ivy
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I think they will test (most

I think they will test (most likely) if a person appears to be impaired,but some police look at pupils,and any of us CPPs might have that side effect.This is becoming increasingly more common because of the enonmy in some areas,but that is only one reason.