Opioid pain patients- this is a must read.

12 replies [Last post]
gtrplayer
gtrplayer's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 week 1 day ago. Offline
Moderator
Joined: Aug 22 2006
Posts: 2915

 

From the DEA webpage. I find this extremely troubling, though I am not surprised. I have many, many feelings about this, but will wait to see how others post, and interpret, this story before I share my opinions. Please let me know what you think:)

The DEA said "October 04, 2016
Contact: DEA Public Affairs
(202) 307-7977

 

DEA Reduces Amount of Opioid Controlled Substances to be Manufactured in 2017

OCT 04 (WASHINGTON) - The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has reduced the amount of almost every Schedule II opiate and opioid medication that may be manufactured in the United States in 2017 by 25 percent or more, according to a Final Order being published in the Federal Register tomorrow and available for public inspection today.  A handful of medicines were reduced by more, such as hydrocodone, which will be 66 percent of last year’s level.  Demand for these opioid medicines, represented by prescriptions written by DEA-registered practitioners, has decreased according to sales data obtained by DEA from IMS Health, a company that provides insurance companies with data on prescriptions written and prescription medications sold in America.


The Aggregate Production Quota (APQ) established by the Final Order is the total amount of a controlled substance necessary to meet the estimated medical, scientific, research, industrial, and export needs for the year and for the maintenance of reserve stocks.  The 2017 APQ has been reduced for oxycodone, hydrocodone, fentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine, and other such medications.  Much of this reduction is attributed to the elimination of a 25 percent buffer that was added to the APQ annually in 2013 through 2016 to guard against shortages.
The 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) released last month found 6.5 million Americans over the age of 12 used controlled prescription medicines non-medically during the past month, second only to [filtered word] and more than past-month users of [filtered word], [filtered word], and hallucinogens combined.   


Earlier this year the CDC issued guidelines to practitioners recommending a reduction in prescribing opioid medications for chronic pain.  For years, DEA and others have been educating practitioners, pharmacists, manufacturers, and the public about the potential dangers of the misuse of opioid medications. 


When Congress passed the Controlled Substances Act (CSA), the quota system was intended to reduce or eliminate diversion from “legitimate channels of trade” by controlling “the quantities of the basic ingredients needed for the manufacture of [controlled substances].” The purpose of quotas are to provide for the adequate and uninterrupted supply for legitimate medical need of the types of schedule I and II controlled substances that have a potential for abuse, while limiting the amounts available to prevent diversion.  DEA establishes APQs for more than 250 Schedule I and II controlled substances annually.


In setting the APQ, DEA considers data from many sources, including estimates of the legitimate medical need; estimates of retail consumption based on prescriptions dispensed; manufacturers’ data on actual production, sales, inventory, exports, product development needs, and manufacturing losses; data from DEA’s own internal system for tracking controlled substance transactions; and past quota histories.  Once the aggregate quota is set, DEA allocates individual manufacturing and procurement quotas to those companies that apply for it.  DEA may revise a company’s quota at any time during the year if change is warranted due to increased sales or exports; new manufacturers entering the market; new product development; or product recalls.

Rocker Dan
Rocker Dan's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 day 23 hours ago. Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 24 2013
Posts: 127
best read

yes I have astatement: Total BS..... DEA being in charge of how much opiods are made then cutting the product by 25% Is a frightining president.RD

gtrplayer
gtrplayer's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 week 1 day ago. Offline
Moderator
Joined: Aug 22 2006
Posts: 2915
I'm glad I'm not the only one

I'm glad I'm not the only one who feels that way , RockerDan. Mt previous pain dr was kicking people out left and right because their script was for hydrocodone, and they were testing + for tramadol. I know it sounds far fetched, and even u doubted the patients until I tyoed in Mylan Norco, and read one of the message boards. 

I'm not saying it happens to everyone, but maybe after the fourth or fifth patient, he probably should have had the patients bring in their pills to be checked by a lab. I know here in America, the idea of a tainted pill seems completely foreign, but it is apparently happening, a lot. 

Luckily, I was on vicoprofen at the time and didn't have to worry about it .

Sidenote, I'm getting ready to post something i think a lot of our pain patients may find helpful. It is a link that was sent to me from the American Pain Association, and believe it or not, even after being kicked out of a group you still have options. 

Give me about 10 minutes 

Rocker Dan
Rocker Dan's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 day 23 hours ago. Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 24 2013
Posts: 127
DEA can blow me

up.Thank you grt player!!!!Yes I do know what you are gonna post.And thank you as i am showing my dr.So i can say,yeah I KNOW!!!!!   Peace and Freedom!!!RD

gtrplayer
gtrplayer's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 week 1 day ago. Offline
Moderator
Joined: Aug 22 2006
Posts: 2915
I have heard of this group

I have heard of this group for awhile now, but never really had a reason to contact them until now.

I have always been, and will always be, an advocate for patients in pain. I do not do the marching thing, or collecting signatures, or whatever else most of these organizations do. The one thing I have always done, though, is try to provide knowledge that is more or less buried- the type of knowledge that, unless you have had to use a group like The Legal Side Of Pain, you most likely would have never heard of.

It is nice to know that there are organizations out there that will help those of us who have truly been wronged by the people we put in charge to help us heal. However, pain medicine is a tricky subject because, as the old adage goes, "pain will not kill you". While that may be true, I have had numerous panic attacks while my pain was reaching levels that I had never experienced. 

I am not advocating persons becoming litigious people. Our country is full of frivolous lawsuits. This company, from what I have read, is pretty good about screening out those who were dismissed for valid reasons, such as multiple failed UDT's, or missed appointments. It seems that this company takes on a lot of cases for people who have been dismissed simply because their insurance did not cover their visits. God forbid the doctors are unable to milk patients with needless injections over the course of many years. Heck, I have almost 20 injections in a 4 year period, and not one of them ever helped for more than a week or two. I don't understand why the doctors insist on giving Lumbar steroid epidural injections for every single patient. It's as if, if you are going to be seen here, you're going to get poked over and over again. 

Anyhow, just my two cents.

 

Rocker Dan
Rocker Dan's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 day 23 hours ago. Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 24 2013
Posts: 127
Mad as ???$*!!!

 

Any more  more &??$ and I will move to Canada.........

Paijon
User offline. Last seen 35 weeks 3 days ago. Offline
Member
Joined: Oct 22 2016
Posts: 1
Govt are who is behind diluting pain med by 25% since 2013

This explains alot. My doctor was finding it hard to believe but yes the DEA is controlling what well educated doctors are allowed to prescribe as well as forcing Pharmacutical companies to change their formulary to make an unacceptable below standard medication. What kind of government is this.. certainly not a democracy.. land of the free. This is organized conspiracy to defraud citizens and forcing them to go through a crippling existence without being able to function by way of living in and with pain. Pain that can be controlled but denied by a government who is phasing out the relief and forcing those to into an intolerable existence.

goat
goat's picture
User offline. Last seen 5 days 12 hours ago. Offline
Moderator
Joined: Nov 21 2006
Posts: 4985
Re..

Agree that the DEA is interfering with my quality of life along with all these drug abusers being saved with narcan

gtrplayer
gtrplayer's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 week 1 day ago. Offline
Moderator
Joined: Aug 22 2006
Posts: 2915
To Paijon

I will never fully support the DEA in regards to them interfering with patients lives, but there are a couple of things you said that need cleared up for our other guests who may read this.

The DEA can not control the amount of pain medication, anxiety medication, or any other controlled substance the doctor writes for. Instead, they frequently release "guidelines" through the CDC. Even though the guidelines, as the CDC puts it, are not law, their recommendations carry an unusally large amount of weight when it comes to influencing doctors. 

Also, the DEA can work with a pharmaceutical company and ask that they change the formula of certain medications in an effort to curb said drugs abuse potential. The formulary, on the other hand, is a list provided to patients through their insurance company detailing what medications are, and are not, covered. A drug excluded from a formulary can still be prescribed to a patient, but a prior authorization from the doctors staff must be placed to the insurance company to explain why they are prescribing "Drug X", when their (the insurance company) prefers the doctor to prescribe "Drug Y". 

The last part of your post, about us being a democracy, has some merit to it. While it is my strong belief that non-doctors, and non-medically trained people should have no say in regards to pharmacy reform- I do understand that they (the people in the CDC and DEA) truly believe they are protecting patients who otherwise can not protect themselves. And while I whole-heartedly agree, even wish, that these agencies would simply leave all alone, we all know it will never happen. The DEA knows they have lost the war on drugs in regards to medically smokable medications (the filter would have XXX'd that had I used the full name of MJ), and in order to save face, they have decided to move towards apprehending easier targets who leave a paper trail- the doctors.

Personally, I believe that if a Dr prescribes an ungodly amount of a narcotic pain medication to someone, it is still the patients responsibility to understand the life and death consequences that can occur if they choose to abuse the medication. A more macabre version of that sentence would read: "If a patient overdoses and dies, so what? The dr did what he/she thought would help, but the patient took more than prescribed." And while I hate to say this at the risk of sounding completely heartless; the fact is, if more people who seek to get medications in order to abuse them simply overdose and die, then this so-called epidimic would go away. A Darwinism effect of sorts. While I wish death on nobody, sometimes it takes these people dying to put an end to the dealers. 

Until a doctor organization shows a backbone and stands up to the DEA, the doctors will continue to underprescribe, for fear of having the DEA come down on them. Life in pain is, indeed, a miserable existence. Unfortunately, no matter how many ACLU representatives are talked to, or lawsuits are threatened; nothing is going to change for quite some time.

Rocker Dan
Rocker Dan's picture
User offline. Last seen 1 day 23 hours ago. Offline
Member
Joined: Nov 24 2013
Posts: 127
drug abuse

  Wow goat,I do not condone drug abuse,however,gosh are you really mad at saving them with Narcan?    Whoa man.They(drug abusers) deserve to live gosh!!! It is wrong of them to abuse,but are you mad that they are causing problems(which they are to a degree) to people with valid medications or that they should die if they do not obtain narcan? Yes there is a drug problem in America.But do not be mad if someone obtains narcan in order to not perish!   no one who is ill deserves to die period.

goat
goat's picture
User offline. Last seen 5 days 12 hours ago. Offline
Moderator
Joined: Nov 21 2006
Posts: 4985
rdan

  What I am upset about is people who recieve multiple does of instant release narcan.  upset that the police and other public servants must now administer narcan to save people who have no respect for their own well being.

    I never wished death on anyone but what I propose is after the very first use of a life saving dose the addict would be required to be implanted with long acting opiod reversal drugs.
   I am in no way mad about things I just don't see instant release narcan as the answe,r if anything it is compounding the issue giving addicts a false sense of safety.