This is not to lead to talk of opiate abuse

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sandi123
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Thanks Goat, you too!

Thanks Goat, you too!

goat
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I want to thank josh

 TQ  for all the nicely worded posts concerning this topic. I am not a big typer and your effort has gave me the words to address this "narcan get as messed up as you can on opiates without the fear of death drug...imo"

gtrplayer
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Not a problem, Goat. Since I

Not a problem, Goat. Since I last posted on here, I had forgotten my password to the site, and in typical fashion, I never got around to password recovery. That is why I haven't been here much; well, that, and the fact I seem to forget to check the site some nights.

I just hope that anything that came from this conversation can be put to good use. You know how I detest the entire "harm reduction" approach to medicine, and likewise, had strong feelings about this subject. I would love to say that I can see where the availability of Narcan being an OTC medicine is a good thing, but I can not bring myself to any other conclusion than, at best, this will serve as a safety net for drug addicts. The help that those addicted to opioids need is not a safety net. They need real, hands on doctors who can break them free if this cycle. Selfishly, I hate the idea (as a pain patient) because the more overdoses there are in a given place, the more the DEA zeroes in on said place. My county is absolutely a mess right now with an influx of an illegal opioid, and I would rather treat the addicts by removing their supply, and suppliers, than I would by simply saying "oh, go to the drugstore and get some narcan. Hard to believe that the Dea does not see this as an unintended form of enabling the addict. 

To think of this in a completely different context; think about driving a vehicle to a long distance vacation. While I could lie and say I just go the posted speedlimit- that is a flat out lie. Why do I speed? Aside from being an impatient person, I have what I "believe" to be a safety net with my radar/lidar detector. However, when that radar detector is not in my car, I do not drive nearly the same way. 

Safety nets are only useful for trapeze artists, not people who are injecting themselves with who knows what. Narcan, like my radar detector, will only make people push the limits.

goat
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TQ Josh

 You summed it up perfectly for me as I am not very good at expressing my views via printed words.

I hope you don't mind if I share some of your eloquent worded posts in my hometown chat board.

 Sadly these dealers of death rarely get much time in jail and are soon right back in the game as it's all they know....thanks all for replies...take care of ourselves. Happy Easter.

gtrplayer
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Go ahead and use anything I said

Goat,

  If it has the possibility to help the situation your community is facing, feel free to use anything I've ever said here, or even in PMs. You don't need to credit me at all- I think that we honest pain patients deserve to be heard, and I do as much as I can to prove that just because a few bad apples exist, which often can lead to an entire bad bucket of apples, we, the law abiding and responsible pain patients should not have to suffer. While I do feel bad for those affected with this horrible drug problem, I refuse to sit by and let those who take to using an illicit opiate be lumped into the same category as us, even if the illicit user started as one of us.

The DEA is waging a losing war on illegal drugs, so they focus on easy targets, such as pain management facilities. While I'm not so naive as to think that every pain Dr is on the up and up, I do believe the majority of them are. I hate that Dr's feel under the microscope, and are afraid to rx adequate dosages of pain medication to those who need it, and I believe that the DEA has actually created this illegal opiate problem by causing doctors to feel they can no longer prescribe opiates. Shoot, just last week, the DEA set forth a whole new set of guidelines for opiate prescribing. While the article did state Dr's are not required to follow these guidelines (they were very restrictive), I can't help but feel that this problem with H, while already rampant, is just beginning. 

But hey, when you can't win a war on drugs, why not just change the rules to create easier targets to arrest. In my opinion, this is an extremely lazy, and ill thought out strategy to create the illusion of the government winning the war on drugs. My personal opinion is that the government, through their increased scrutiny on drs, has created a whole new battlefront on which to wage war on drugs. Prior to the DEA becoming vulchers on drs (the same Dea who gave the FDA approval for an ER version of hydrocodone- a drug that every Dr I know was scared to death of), my community "only" had problems with synthetic amphetamines. Now, I can't read our local police scanner page without seeing, on average, 3 OD calls.

I know that I am usually the one defending policy and government, but until someone calls them out (I'm looking at you Association for Pain Managent) for creating this quagmire, it's only going to get worse. Let the drs do what they are trained to do, and let the junkies be left to seek out other places, preferably outside of our country, to get their fix. Places where the jail time for possession of hard drugs is more than in-home detention with unsupervised probation.

End Rant.