Will tightened painkiller regulations reduce drug abuse?

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SuSu1956
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Just read this article on AOL this morning. Looks like starting in October 2014, Hydrocodone with acetaminophen will become a Schedule II drug instead of a less-restrictive Schedule III drug.

I have copied and pasted the article below for members on this website to read. Seems like it is getting to where the government is going to make it harder for those of us who need pain meds in order to have a "somewhat normal life"  even though we suffer daily with our pain, the government is "calling the shots on tightening painkiller regulations thinking that it will reduce drug abuse".

"The Drug Enforcement Administration has announced tighter restrictions on prescription painkillers in an effort to curb drug abuse in the U.S.

According to a notice published in the Federal Register, the regulation will classify hydrocodone-combination products, such as Vicodin, as a Schedule II drug instead of a less-restrictive Schedule III drug. Pure hydrocodone has already been listed as a Schedule II drug since the 1970s.

Hydrocodone is one of the most prescribed and most abused painkillers in the U.S. The move is part of the government's effort to reduce what it calls a growing epidemic of prescription drug abuse.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 15,000 deaths in 2008 were due to prescription painkiller overdoses, compared to just 4,000 in 1999.

The Food and Drug Administration first recommended the restrictions in January 2013. The new rules will put tighter regulations on doctors as well as manufacturers and pharmacies.

Under schedule II regulations, doctors can only prescribe a supply of the drug limited to 90 days with no refills. And one medical professional tells The Wall Street Journal pharmacies will now have to keep those drugs secured and will only accept written prescriptions.

Now, the government believes these regulations will help fight hydrocodone addiction, although it has not specified how the regulations will contribute to a decrease in drug abuse in general.

Other experts think it might make it more difficult for those who rely on these medications for chronic pain to keep their prescriptions filled.

According to USA Today, the FDA has resisted implementing similar regulations in the past for this exact reason. But it finally changed its stance amid the growing number of reports of widespread abuse.

But one addiction specialist tells The New York Times the change might even cause a hike in the use of other illegal drugs such as [filtered word].

Others question whether these regulations are comprehensive enough.

FOX BUSINESS: "It's people going in the medicine cabinet, it's illegal drugs, prescription drugs getting on the illegal market. The government needs to do more. ... Oxycodone is already in schedule II, that causes more deaths."

The new regulations will take effect in October."  Frown


SuSu1956

 

gtrplayer
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Nope

Unfortunately, there is just going to be a shift from opioid abusers from prescription opioids to illegal forms of opioids. It's already happened in numerous areas in the US. I feel so sorry for so many doctors, and so many patients. The DEA lost their war on illegal drugs, so they choose to go after the easiest targets: people in pain, and those who adequately treat them.

In no way, shape, or form should the government here in America, or anywhere else for that matter, be the decider of what is considered too much pain medication. I am 100% in agreement with the government in terms of shutting down pill mills- those things make all of us chronic pain patients look like drug addicts. However, when they start telling doctors they can only prescribe this much of this, or this much of that, they are overstepping their boundaries (in my humble, and probably wrong, opinion.).

If the DEA wanted to truly help our communities with drug problems, they would have responded to the numerous calls I made to our local police department when I knew for a fact one of my neighbors was manufacturing an illegal drug. They need to cut off the cartels, and the pushers on the street. Granted, some of those pushers are probably pushing prescription medication, but the problem is not with the medication. The problem is the pusher. How is the doctor supposed to know that once a patient leaves his/her office, the patient is going to be law-abiding, and do the proper thing with their medication? There is no way. So some idiot will overdose, which will lead to a coroners investigation of the body, which will lead to the deceased medical records being looked through, which will undoubtedly make the prescriber of the medication a defendant. Things have gotten ridiculous. It is almost as if the DEA can not do their intended purpose, so they shift their focus.

Get nose candy off the streets. Get H off the streets. Get all the designer drugs of the streets. When you get that accomplished, you know, your regular goal; let me know.

To all the Pharmer family- sorry for the out of character post. I have just become so frustrated with so many things I continue to read that has happened around my city and state, that it makes me sick. Urologists prescribing Suboxone on a cash only basis. No record keeping whatsoever. These are the kind that need to be taken down. Yet, when you inform the proper authorities, I always receive the same thing: "Thank you for the information, we will pass it along." Nothing happens for four or five years, then all at once, there is a huge rash of arrests of doctors, and when you read the affidavits, you find out that the information you gave them four or five years earlier fell on deaf ears because their probe into illegal activity has only been going on for a year and a half, after wealthy businessmen and development teams complained to the city council that it is impossible for them to try to "build up" the community when drugs are being diverted adjacent to parks.

Gtrplayer

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I actually

Have some feelings relating to this post.  I am NOT a long term pain patient. But i do get hydrocodone combinations prescribed to me for coughs...nothing more (no not pain or anything else..just a sore throat). My Primary Physician is now refusing all hydrocodone prescribtions that are being RXd at her office now... Yes I am RXd benzodiazepines and muscule relaxants but i do not mix hydrocodone in my RX. I've heard of people saying that "Xanax, Soma, Hydrocodone" is called "The Holy Trinity."  Probably sounds about right for somebody about to OD or try something stupid but i find it highly offensive when my regular phyisician says NO to all hydrocodone products. Just to save her ^*#%.  Well i guess i will have to see how codeine works,,,because i never use it,,, its too sedating..

DyBNaps
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I have never realy heard of a

I have never realy heard of a combo Hydro syrup for cough. What is the brand label for that? Just intersted. I know they have it for people unable to digest pills, or not able break down. I codein is usually many times less potent, and should have quite a bit less sedation than hydrocodone. Interested in how things worked out for you. All the rappers like the codein syrup to make their purple drank, and get doped up. Wonder how this is so available in the south, I have never seen a combo syrup prescribed much in the the midwest.

SuSu1956
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Hydro Syrup for cough

Tussionex Syrup

Tussionex contains a combination of chlorpheniramine and hydrocodone.
Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine.
Hydrocodone is a narcotic cough suppressant.

 

SuSu1956


 

goat
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promethazine with codiene

 popular with the kids who abuse it is promethazine with codiene.

gtrplayer
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What's funny to me is how

What's funny to me is how this supposed clamp down in opioid medication began with the mandate "lower the Tylenol exposure to those chronically taking APAP containing combinations" to "don't prescribe narcotics longer than X days". To my knowledge, the clamp down is still just in "suggestion" form, but, a lot of Dr's are buying into this mess.

 

gtrplayer
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Bunch of hydrocodone cough syrups

Doesn't anyone else remember being prescribed hycodan, vicodin-tuss, or Codimal hp? Aside from Tussionex, most Dr's I know of have opted instead to rx regular codeine containing products. Probably a good idea around here. By the way, I've actually seen a Dr take a script back from a patient who claimed to be allergic to Codeine+Promethazine, tear it up, and tell the patient that their best bet, then, would be to try some Delsym. That was funny because it was at an urgent care facility, and the dude was clearly drug seeking. From a room over, with my nephew, we could hear the guy come up with 3 or 4 different "painful" problems he was having that he just couldn't treat because he couldn't take NSAIDS, and Tylenol was bad for you (his words). Anyhow.

It's been forever since I had to take a cough medication, especially since I am in pain management. But, back when I was little, I remember having the worst experience of my life after being given my cough syrup before a baseball game. I was 12 years old, 36 now, but remember it like it was yesterday. Almost 45 minutes after taking the tsp my mom gave me, and about 6 hours before my schedule ballgame, I started crying for no real reason, other than I couldn't stop crying. It was embarrassing, since I had to go back to the Dr that day to figure out why I was crying so much. The Dr even asked me why I was crying, and all I could say was "because I can't quit crying." 

Man, I bet I made a lot of people in the waiting room mad... or at the very least, extremely uncomfortable. Not that any of that had to do with the OP, just a little anecdote. My mom always had this rule: if you miss school, you're going to the dr. My Dr at the time was about 70 years old, and despite knowing I had a baseball game later that day, he prescribed me to take 1/2 of a Tylenol 3. I also had a terrible ear infection. Rather than Admit I was a coddled wimpy kid, I'm going to instead say that I had to have been crying from the ear pain, and the sore throat that I had at the time as well. 

Plus I was a wimpy, coddled 12 year old.

 

gtrplayer
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Think about the football

Think about the football player who was caught transporting 3 cases of codeine + Promethazine. Unfortunately, the medication is often times unaccounted for once it leaves the distribution center...assuming it ever makes it out of the distribution center. 

 

This was a response to DyBNaps. Not sure why it posted way down here. Also, the medication I mention have been phased out in most pharmacies where I live. 

Rocker Dan
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drug abuse

NO!!!!! All mesures to restrict perscrption opiates will result is a alarming increase in [filtered word]........much more than even now..........Alll walks of life and all classes of people will gravitate twords this drug!!! And now [filtered word] comes ready to inhale as opsed to a needle......I know a person who was off all things including alcohol who went in to a Doctor for a pinched nerve and was given 60 norcos and this was last week.For all of us who really suffer with real pain i have been told there should and will be no changes.All that this lateset atemt to "curb" perscription drug abuse is a "stranger danger" type of program which everyone knows was a failure.....RD

gaucho
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Abuse Reduction?

Absolutely NOT.

People intent on abusing drugs will always be able somehow to acquire what they seek. Initiatives like this (and the current analgesic policy in the UK) does little but deprive honest chronic pain patients of the medications which will render them pretty much pain-free. As a patient in that category since 1994, I have seen my analgesia reduced considerably despite rising pain levels. I am on one third of my original 1997 OxyContin dosage and get no rescue meds, so have to do what abusers do and acquire from 'other' sources. At great cost. Doctors here are so bad that theythink they know better than the patient what drugs at what dosages are required; they also believe that dulling the pain down a bit is appropriate,  and seem to havw little interest in what the sufferer tells them. 

I am afraid that opioids in particular are being criminally underprescribed, even in those such as myself who will, at my age, probably be on such meds for life and only want to be pain FREE and my mobility increased without having to stopevery 25m or so because the pain gets unbearable. I have to travel to Netherlands to get Palfium as dipopanone Iis now rarely prescribed; I wish that I had sources in the US for high dosage (4/8mg) hydromorphone (DILAUDID) & Endo IR OPANA oxymorphone, licenced only in US and Bangladesh. (The latter should be taken intranasally as bioavailabilityorally Iis a puny 10%, whilst when insufflated, preferably in pure API form rather than a crushed tablet with all those fillers and binders, it leaps up to a huge 90%! And I am reliably informed that Opana is at least as good ananalgesic as the wonderful dipipanone.

Shooting themselves in the foot, I call it; it's the genuine amongst us who suffer from such policies.