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Senate rule deals setback to Republican healthcare bill

Reuters Health News - July 21, 2017 - 7:50pm
(Reuters) - Republicans in the U.S. Senate were dealt another blow in their effort to repeal Obamacare on Friday when the keeper of the Senate's rules said certain provisions in their healthcare bill, such as defunding Planned Parenthood, could not be included.
Categories: Consumer Health News

Trump Jr., Manafort in talks with Senate panel

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 7:40pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's eldest son and his former campaign chairman are discussing being privately interviewed by a Senate committee investigating Russia's meddling in the 2016 election, the panel confirmed Friday.


Categories: Pharma News

The Galaxy Note 8’s secret weapon might be… a Bluetooth headset?

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 7:00pm

Samsung’s second-worst-kept secret of the year will launch on August 23rd, the company has now confirmed. That was a date that was first mentioned in Galaxy Note 8 rumors earlier this year.

However, we already think we know everything about the new flagship, which should be a Galaxy S8 variation featuring a few extra tricks. The Galaxy Note 8 will have a dual camera lens on the back and a built-in stylus, as well as stylus-centric features baked into Android.

A new report indicates there may be one thing that’ll differentiate the Galaxy Note 8 from the Galaxy S8: a new Bixby accessory.

Samsung is working on a Bluetooth headset, ETNews reports, and development may be done in time for the Galaxy Note 8’s launch. The device might be released alongside the Galaxy Note 8 in September, and it may be bundled with the phablet. Samsung, however, hasn’t decided on how to sell it. It’s likely that it’ll be available as a standalone product in the future, regardless of how Samsung commercializes it at launch.

The headset is supposed to help users communicate with Bixby, and features proprietary noise canceling technology, the report notes.

A Samsung representative did confirm the existence of the product, and the fact that it’s made for easier interaction with Bixby, but said the company could not disclose any release date information about the product.

It’s unclear how much it’ll cost, and there are no images of this Bixby headset for the Galaxy Note 8.


Categories: Pharma News

Former McCain rival suggests he resign because of cancer

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 6:36pm

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An Arizona Republican who tried to oust Sen. John McCain last year suggested Friday that he resign because he has been diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer.


Categories: Pharma News

Sprint is just straight-up trolling Verizon now

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 6:12pm

In absence of actually having a good network, Sprint is relying on some top-notch PR to bother Verizon. Sprint already stole away Verizon's signature spokesperson -- Mr "Can You Hear Me Now?" -- and it's now hitting on Verizon's pricing with a savage stunt.

For one day only, Sprint has opened up a "Twice the Price" shop next to a Verizon store in Queens, NY. The concept is a store filled with regular things that are twice the price, just like Verizon's plans are twice the price of Sprint.

It's an incredibly brazen attempt to hit Verizon where it hurts most, and it is kinda funny. Verizon has arguably the best network around: it comes joint-top in most speed tests with T-Mobile, and its coverage is hands-down the best in rural areas and indoors.

But Verizon's pricing is undeniably high. Even the new Unlimited plan, which was meant to be Verizon's answer to T-Mobile One, is $80 a month for the first line.

Now, you can argue that Verizon's plans are still value for money. The Unlimited plan comes with good perks like 10GB of hotspot data, which you pay extra for on T-Mobile (or anyone else), and Verizon does get you more consistent coverage.

But for the average user, Sprint's betting that paying half the price makes up for any shortcomings in service. Sprint doesn't have the money to build out its network to compete with Verizon, so the "Twice the Price" store is going to have to do as a competitive strategy for now.


Categories: Pharma News

The Latest: Abortion restrictions in health bill questioned

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 5:51pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Republican attempts to overhaul the nation's health care laws (all times local):


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Warren Buffet Blames ‘Stupidity’ For Not Investing In Amazon

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 5:30pm

Here's what the famed billionaire had to say about the e-commerce giant.


Categories: Pharma News

U.S. general told Syria's YPG: 'You have got to change your brand'

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 5:29pm

One of America's most senior generals said on Friday he instructed the Kurdish YPG militia to change its "brand" a day or so before it unveiled an alliance with Syrian Arabs in 2015 under the name Syrian Democratic Forces. The recounting by U.S. Army General Raymond Thomas, the head of Special Operations Command, offered a glimpse into the mechanics that preceded a major rampup in U.S. support to the Kurdish fighters despite fierce opposition from NATO ally Turkey. Turkey views the YPG as an extension of PKK militants waging an insurgency on Turkish soil, and has sharply criticized U.S. support to the group, which has increased over time.


Categories: Pharma News

Apple Patches Serious Wi-Fi Exploit In iOS 10.3.3

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 5:22pm

Apple's iOS 10.3.3 update fixes a major security flaw that allowed for remote code execution to be done on iOS devices via its Wi-Fi chip.


Categories: Pharma News

Visa issues take spotlight after Burundi teens exit event

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 5:08pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The big controversy leading up to the FIRST Global international robotics competition in Washington was whether a team of girls from Afghanistan would be able to participate, after their initial visa applications were denied.


Categories: Pharma News

'You belong here,' Gabriel tells Germany's Turks

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 5:06pm

Germany will stand by the three million people with Turkish roots living there, its foreign minister said, offering assurances that they were not Berlin's targets in a rapidly escalating political row with Ankara. In an open letter published on Saturday in mass-circulation daily Bild, Sigmar Gabriel said Germany had to look after its own but had no quarrel with Turkish people in either country. "However difficult the political relations between Germany and Turkey, one thing is clear: you, people of Turkish roots in Germany belong here with us, whether you have a German passport or not." Gabriel's intervention came after his cabinet colleague, Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, compared Turkey's actions in detaining six human rights activists, including a German, to the authoritarian former communist East Germany.


Categories: Pharma News

National Weather Service cancels its union contract

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 4:53pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — In what could be the first major labor showdown of the Trump administration, the National Weather Service announced it will cancel its contract with the union representing about 3,800 of its meteorologists and other workers.


Categories: Pharma News

Lesser-known gene mutations may boost breast cancer risk in Jewish women

Reuters Health News - July 21, 2017 - 4:37pm
(Reuters Health) - Jewish women of European descent may be at risk for additional genetic mutations that increase their risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.
Categories: Consumer Health News

Kentucky to Pay Attorney Fees for Defiant County Clerk

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 4:31pm

A federal judge has ordered Kentucky taxpayers to pay more than $220,000 in attorneys' fees for an elected county clerk who caused a national uproar by refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples in 2016.


Categories: Pharma News

US special ops chief confirms CIA ending support for Syria rebels

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 4:29pm

The head of the US military's special operations confirmed Friday that the Central Intelligence Agency is shutting down its program to support rebels fighting against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. General Tony Thomas denied that the four-year-old operation was brought to an end as a way to placate Russia and earn its support for a ceasefire in southwestern Syria. It was a "tough, tough decision" but "absolutely not a sop to the Russians," Thomas said at a forum in Aspen, Colorado.


Categories: Pharma News

U.S. CDC says salmonella outbreak linked to papayas sickens 47

Reuters Health News - July 21, 2017 - 4:22pm
(Reuters) - An outbreak of salmonella food poisoning linked to a type of papaya has sickened 47 people from 12 states, including one person in New York City who died and 12 who were hospitalized, U.S. health officials said on Friday.
Categories: Consumer Health News

Ex-CIA Director Hayden: Russia election meddling was ‘most successful covert operation in history’

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 4:20pm

Michael Hayden, former head of the NSA and CIA, called Russia’s interference in the 2016 election the “most successful covert influence operation in history.”


Categories: Pharma News

Republicans close to blocking Trump from easing Russia sanctions

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 4:17pm

In a rare show of defiance, Republicans in Congress are coming close to preventing Donald Trump from being able to roll back sanctions against Russia. The White House has sought to change a bill that would toughen sanctions on Moscow for meddling in the 2016 US election. Despite telling reporters that the White House supports new sanctions on Russia, Marc Short, its legislative director, declared that the bill would set “an unusual precedent of delegating foreign policy to 535 members of Congress.


Categories: Pharma News

Two Israeli police officers killed by Palestinian gunmen near Jerusalem holy site, police say

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 3:55pm

Palestinian gunmen ambushed and killed two Israeli police officers at the al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem on Friday, bringing bloodshed and chaos to a religious site that is sacred to both Jews and Muslims.  According to Israeli police, the three attackers smuggled weapons into the mosque complex - which is known to Jews as the Temple Mount - and then burst out and opened fire on the officers early on Friday morning.  All three of the attackers were killed in the shoot out. One of them was gunned down on a plaza in front of the Dome of the Rock, one of Jerusalem’s best known sites.   Palestinians clash with Israeli security forces outside Jerusalem's Old city on Friday Credit: Ronen Zvulun/Reuters The shooting led to the cancellation of Friday prayers at the mosque for the first time in decades. Israeli authorities said the mosque, which is the third holiest site in Islam, would remain shut until at least Sunday.   The attackers were all Israeli citizens of Palestinian descent and came from an Arab village in northern Israel, according to the Shin Bet, Israel’s equivalent of MI5. Two of them were 19 and the third was 29 and all they appear to all be relatives.  One of Jerusalem attackers posted a selfie at al-Aqsa right before the shooting. He wrote: "Tomorrow's smile will be more beautiful" pic.twitter.com/Bfs2iLh0li— Raf Sanchez (@rafsanchez) July 14, 2017 No group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack but at least one of the gunmen appears to have been motivated by the belief that Israel was trying take control of the mosque.  Mohamammed Hamed Jabreen posted a selfie of himself in front of the Dome of the Rock shortly before the attack, with the message: “Tomorrow's smile will be more beautiful, God willing.” Under an agreement struck after the 1967 war, Jews are only allowed to go the site at certain times and cannot pray there, while Muslims can access it at almost all times. Jewish visits to the site are a constant source of tension.  Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas speaking on Friday Credit:  ABBAS MOMANI/AFP Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister, and Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian president, spoke after the attack and both appealed for calm following the violence at the sensitive site.  Mr Abbas condemned the attack but also called on Israel to re-open the mosque and allow Friday prayers to go ahead. Israeli authorities refused, saying they needed to search the complex for weapons.  Mr Netanyahu said he remained committed to the status quo agreement at the mosque complex. Israel has always denied it has any plans change the agreement, which has more or less held for fifty years.    Palestinian Muslim worshippers pray outside Damascus Gate, a main entrance to Jerusalem's Old City on Friday Credit: GALI TIBBON/AFP Reuven Rivlin, the Israeli president, said: "We cannot allow for agents of murder, who desecrate the name of God, to drag us into a bloody war, and we will deal with a heavy hand against all the arms of terror, and its perpetrators." The most senior Islamic cleric at the mosque, Mohammed Hussein, was taken into custody by Israeli troops but released later in the day.  Police sealed most of the gates of Jerusalem’s Old City after the attack and many Muslim worshippers prayed in the streets in 91F (33C) heat.  Video block text Mahmoud Abu Khdeir, a 74-year-old Palestinian man from Jerusalem, prayed in the street when he was not allowed to go to the mosque.  Asked what he thought of the attack, he replied: "We say it is good and it is bad. It's good because for the young men who did it, they are heroic and fought the occupation. It's not good because al-Aqsa is a house of God and it's Friday, the holy day, and people came from all over to pray."   Israeli security forces arrest a Palestinian man following clashes outside Jerusalem's Old city on Friday Credit: Ammar Awad/Reuters The two police officers killed were both from Israel’s Druze minority.  They were named as Kamil Shnaan, 22, the son of a former Israeli member of parliament and Haiel Sitawe, who became a father three weeks ago. They were both buried on Friday night, just hours after their deaths. A wave of unrest that broke out in October 2015 has claimed the lives of at least 277 Palestinians, 42 Israelis, two Americans, two Jordanians, an Eritrean, a Sudanese and a Briton, according to an AFP toll. Israeli authorities say most of the Palestinians killed were carrying out knife, gun or car-ramming attacks. Others were shot dead in protests and clashes, while some were killed in Israeli air strikes on the Gaza Strip. The violence has greatly subsided in recent months.


Categories: Pharma News

The many indignities of Sean Spicer

Pharma news - July 21, 2017 - 3:49pm

White House press secretary Sean Spicer resigned his post Friday after six months and one half day on the job, surviving almost weekly predictions of his imminent departure at the hands of one or another of the president’s aides and advisers. The final indignity appeared to be Trump’s hiring of Anthony Scaramucci as the new White House communications director, which became public shortly before.


Categories: Pharma News
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